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Broken Elevator at Portage and Main Suggests Accessibility’s Not A Priority, Advocate Says

Allen Mankewich says the wheelchair lift at 201 Portage Ave. is often out of service
Holly Caruk · CBC News · Posted: Mar 04, 2019 10:16 AM CT | Last Updated: March 4

Allen Mankewich, a consultant with the Independent Living Resource Centre who uses a wheelchair, says the broken lift forces people in wheelchairs to travel blocks out of their way on snowy sidewalks just to cross the street.

A Winnipeg man is frustrated after a broken wheelchair lift has gone unrepaired for weeks at downtown Winnipeg’s busiest intersection.

Paralympic Medalists Check Accessibility of 2020 Tokyo Games Venue Area

February 17, 2019 (Mainichi Japan)

TOKYO — Paralympic medalists have inspected parts of the capital’s Koto Ward, host to two Tokyo 2020 swimming venues, to see if the area meets the growing demand for easier access for people with disabilities.

A Mainichi Shimbun reporter joined the athletes’ first check of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics venue sites on Jan. 20. The aim: to assess the current environment as well as facilities with barrier-free concepts. The meeting point with Paralympians Association of Japan (PAJ) chairman Junichi Kawai, 43, and former Japan national wheelchair basketball player Katsumi Miyake, 48, was outside the Tokyo Metro’s Tatsumi Station ticket gate.

Calgary Building Receives $72,000 Toward Accessibility Renovations

by Kayla Bruch
Originally Posted Jan 22, 2019

CALGARY (660 NEWS) Seventy-two thousand dollars will go a long way in renovating a local community space.

Minister of Public Services and Procurement and Accessibility, Honourable Carla Qualtrough, said the Evergreen Community SPACES building in Calgary is receiving this money through the Enabling Accessibility Fund.

“The idea of creating initiatives that remove barriers for people with disabilities is really the idea of making our country better and more equal,” said Qualtrough.

She adds Canada can’t succeed as a country unless we give everyone an equal opportunity, and we can’t achieve this if 20 per cent of the population is excluded.

Age-Friendly Community Committee aims to increase accessibility

By Evan Jones
January 17, 2019

Many East Lansing residents go through doorways and live in apartments without realizing the barriers common designs present to older members of the community.

Through the Age-Friendly Community Committee, citizens and government leaders are working to improve accessibility and bridge the generational gap.

The City of East Lansing created the committee in 2017 to continue working toward an Age-Friendly Community designation, which the World Health Organization, or WHO, describes in a 76-page guide(opens in new tab/window). While the problem is described by the WHO through a global lens, they aim to inspire communities to improve access for their own aging populations.

UK Faces Accessible Housing Crisis – Only 7% of Homes Deemed Accessible

Controversy rang out in November 2018 when the Home Builders Federation objected to councils across England wanting to increase the number of homes with universal home designed centered around accessibility.

Organizations such as Age UK and the Centre for Ageing Better and Disability Rights UK released reports stating that only 7% of homes classify as accessible, causing a rift in a housing market that so poorly serves those with limited mobility.

While currently trying to fight this injustice, organizations are being met with resistance in their fight for housing options that are suitable for all and meet higher accessibility standards.

Welcome Mat: Study Finds Accessibility Key in Bathroom Reno Designs

Maureen Feighan, The Detroit News
Published Dec. 20, 2018

Aging baby boomers who’d like to stay in their homes as they grow older are making accessibility a big part of their bathroom renovations plans, making them bigger and adding features like grab bars, according to Houzz.com’s new 2018 U.S. Bathroom Trends Study.

The survey of 1,100 homeowners, released in mid November, found that one-third of Baby Boomers are addressing current aging needs, while nearly a quarter are planning ahead for future needs as they renovate a master bathroom.

The survey also found 47 percent change the bathroom layout and 34 percent remove the bathtub.

Accessibility Problems Still Not Fixed at MUHC SuperHospital: Report

Of more than 50 recommendations to improve access for the disabled at the MUHC superhospital, six have been implemented so far. Aaron Derfel, Montreal Gazette
Updated: October 16, 2018

More than a year after an independent report found numerous problems with accessibility for the disabled and other patients at the MUHC superhospital, the McGill University Health Centre has still not fixed most of the deficiencies, the Montreal Gazette has learned.

The MUHC commissioned the report by two experts at the Université de Montréal after the patients committee raised repeated concerns about the lack of clear signage, the scarcity of wheelchairs in the lobby, the confusing layout and poor access to public bathrooms for the mobility-challenged. The report uncovered visual and physical obstacles in 19 categories, a dozen of which were deemed urgent.

Wheelchair Users Sue Orioles Over Camden Yards Accessibility

The Associated Press
October 02, 2018

BALTIMORE Three wheelchair users are suing the Baltimore Orioles over accessibility at Camden Yards.

News outlets report the lawsuit filed Friday against the team and the Maryland Stadium Authority says each plaintiff has been stuck in a wheelchair lift while trying to get to their seats. And the view from lower-level wheelchair-accessible seats is obstructed whenever fans stand up.

Plaintiff’s attorney Sharon Krevor-Weisbaum says the Americans with Disabilities Act mandated “equal enjoyment of the services.” Another plaintiff’s attorney, Kevin D. Docherty, criticized the Orioles for July’s “Celebrate ADA Day.”

The plaintiffs seek damages of at least $75,000 each, and a Camden Yards that’s compliant by the next baseball season.

RAM Clarifies Accessible Parking Plans for New Museum

After the province said there would be no accessible parking spots at the new museum, RAM said there would be. Julia Parrish, Web Reporter, CTV Edmonton
@JuliaParrishCTV
Published Wednesday, September 26, 2018 3:51PM MDT

In an online post, the Royal Alberta Museum (RAM) says there will be accessible parking spots at the new museum.

The statement was posted Tuesday on the museum’s Facebook page, saying there would be three accessible parking spots just outside the main doors on the west side.

The post said there are wheelchair ramps outside the building leading up to the doors, and there is direct access to the museum through the LRT pedway, with elevators available to get to public transit. The building also features accessible washrooms.

Disability Community Struggles to Find Accessible Apartments in Rockford

Posted: Jul 19, 2018

When C.J. Campbell moved back to Rockford 8 years ago, it was an uphill battle to find a place to call home.

“There’s a two year waiting list generally and its very limited apartments and generally the apartments are quite old and not up to ADA standards,” Campbell said.

That’s a big challenge for Campbell, who’s been using a wheelchair his whole life.

“I discovered that it’s very difficult to find accessible housing not just here in the Stateline, but everywhere in the United States,” Campbell said.

“Housing really is one of the biggest barriers people with disabilities face,” Eric Brown said.

New Canadian Accessibility Standard for Buildings Benefits Everyone, Disability Advocates Say

By Wanyee LiStarMetro Vancouver

VANCOUVERPeople with disabilities often get their own cashier line, their own bathroom stall, their own entrance and that type of building design amounts to segregation, disability advocates say.

Part of the problem is that Canada did not have a standard for accessibility design in buildings, said Brad McCannell, vice-president of access and inclusion with the Rick Hansen Foundation.

(left) Brad McCannell, vice president of access and inclusion with the Rick Hansen Foundation, (centre) Kirsten Sutton, vice president of and managing director at SAP Labs Canada, and Rick Hansen, founder of the Rick Hansen Foundation, celebrate a ‘Accessibility Certified Gold’ rating at SAP Labs’ Yaletown office.

HealthHack 2018 Winner Aims for Better Accessibility in Edmonton

By Kerry McAthey
Radio Anchor/Reporter 630CHED

Navigating Edmonton in a wheelchair takes a lot of force, according to the Click N’ Push application

Navigating Edmonton in a wheelchair takes a lot of force, according to the Click N’ Push application

The winner of this year’s HealthHack Smart Cities Challenge is aiming to make Edmonton more accessible to those who use wheelchairs.

Professor at the Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine at the University of Alberta Martin Ferguson-Pell and his team have developed Click N’ Push an app that shows just how difficult it can be to get around the city in a wheelchair.

New Accessibility Regulations for N.L. Buildings, Parking Lots

New regulations for parking lots, washrooms, wheelchair ramps and more included in amendments CBC News Posted: Oct 23, 2017

Service NL is bringing in new regulations which will bring Newfoundland and Labrador up to national standards for having accessible buildings and facilities.

The Newfoundland and Labrador government says changes are coming to accessibility regulations for buildings, parking lots and other facilities in the province.

Service NL announced Monday its intentions to amend the Buildings Accessibility Regulations and Mobility Impaired Parking Regulations.

The new rules will apply to new construction and to buildings being extensively renovated.

Angry Note Left on Wheelchair Accessible Van attracting attention

Angry Note Left on Wheelchair Accessible Van attracting attention

Published Friday, November 22, 2013 6:45PM CST
Last Updated Friday, November 22, 2013 6:46PM CST

It’s a story that began with mean notes left on the windshield of a wheelchair lift van, but now, one woman’s story is prompting people in Saskatoon to take a second look at accessibility issues.

CTV News was with Desirée Parisien as she shared some of the notes.

“You are parked like a complete jackass,” one note read. “You are in two spots, one of which is for pregnant ladies. Stupidity is not a handicap. Use your wheelchair sticker for a better cause. Don’t use it for an excuse.”

New Yorkers with Disabilities Neglected In City’s Emergency Planning

Brooklyn Center for Independence of the Disabled (BCID), et al. v. Mayor Bloomberg, et al
Posted February 28, 2013

More than a decade after 9/11, New Yorkers with disabilities continue to face disproportionate risks of catastrophic harm and death when disasters strike, like Hurricane Irene and Superstorm Sandy.

People with disabilities impacted by Sandy reported a lack of evacuation, wheelchair accessible emergency shelters, and power outages, which left them stranded in their homes, without vital medical equipment, and prescription medications. Such events show that New York City lacks an adequate emergency plan that accounts for the needs of people with disabilities during an emergency.

Scandic Hotels Wins Major Procurement Contract in Norway

Posted January 9, 2013

Scandic Hotels has won a 4-year framework agreement with the Norwegian Children and Young People’s Agency, Bufdir, with a total value of around EUR 6 million. Scandic was the clear winner in the procurement process thanks to its investment in increased accessibility for people with disabilities.

Bufdir’s quotation requirement was in three categories; bed/breakfast, meetings and customised conference packages, and Scandic won all three categories.

This is an excellent example of Scandic’s commitment to accessibility paying off – and the fact that Scandic is way ahead of the competition. We continuously invest more money making our hotels accessible for all our guests.

Advocates Have Sought Bumpy Tiles for About 20 Years

Kytja Weir, Staff writer – Transportation
The Washington Examiner, October 5, 2012

The battle over installing bumpy tiles at Metro’s stations has been going on for about 20 years, long after the Americans with
Disabilities Act called for adding “detectable warnings” known as truncated
domes to platform edges in train stations by 1993.

Metro board member Mortimer Downey recalled the agency’s resistance when he served as U.S. Department of Transportation deputy secretary from 1993 to 2001.

“Metro wasted two years of my time telling me they did not want to put in the tiles and did not think it was feasible to do it,” he
said during a recent board meeting.

Group Pushes for Wheelchair Access to Patios

CBC News, August 22, 2012.

An advocacy group for people with disabilities is pushing to make Montreal’s patios more wheelchair accessible.

Linda Gauthier, president of the Regroupement Activistes Pour l’Inclusion Québec, or RAPLIQ, said Tuesday that most of Montreal’s restaurant and bar terrasses are still inaccessible to wheelchairs.

Montreal is known for its restaurant, café and bar patios, but too many of them are inaccessible to wheelchairs, an advocacy group says. (CBC)

“It’s exactly the same thing that if there would be a black person they would tell him, ‘You’re not allowed on my terrasse because of your colour.’
It’s discrimination,” Gauthier said.

Playground Designed for Disabled Users

By Jeff Bell, Times Colonist April 13, 2012

The Blanshard Community Centre and its refurbished playground provided the backdrop Thursday for a federal funding announcement aimed at improving accessibility for people with disabilities.

Ontario Conservative MP Dr. Kellie Leitch, parliamentary secretary to Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Diane Finley, said the centre’s specially designed playground is an example of how the federal Enabling Accessibility Fund works. The Kings Road site was granted $50,636 from the fund in 2010 and the playground was installed soon after.

Kelly Greenwell, the centre’s executive director, said much effort went into securing money for the project until the Enabling Accessibility Fund came through. “We tried a lot of different ways to get something like this here.”

Aging in Place: How to Remodel Your Home and Stay as Long as Possible

by Jennifer Grey, HousingForSeniors.com Columnist
June 15, 2011

There are plenty of wonderful senior living communities out there. But for many older adults, no matter how lovely the neighborhood and how terrific the services, a senior community isn’t the first choice—staying at home is.

It’s difficult for older adults to stay in the home as they age—because many homes were not designed to accommodate aging in place. Still, you can make some basic changes to your home that will make it easier for you to stay as you age. Here are a few ideas for older adults who want to stay in their homes as long as possible.