Human Rights Success: Disabling a System of Discrimination

December 12, 2010
By Chris Bowerman, Writer
Troy Media

Dec. 12, 2010/ Troy Media/ – Canada’s success in rooting out discrimination is often lost in a national debate that focuses on the failings of human rights
commissions.

The country’s system of meting out justice in cases of inequality is not without its many bright spots, however.

In one particular case concluded earlier this year, a complaint concluded in a triple-whammy success for the federal human rights agencies, disabled Canadians and Elections Canada.

In relatively swift succession, an informed citizen’s complaint was investigated by the Canadian Human Rights Commission, referred to the tribunal, and
resolved with co-operation from the respondent – Elections Canada – which is implementing comprehensive orders to reform its electoral procedures and training.

My Proposed Dec. 16 ADA Regulatory Hearing Testimony

By Blind Access Journal

I will be testifying on Dec. 16 in Washington D.C. at a Department of Justice hearing on proposed new ADA regulations to expand accessibility requirements for websites, closed captioning, video description, electronic equipment (ATMs, kiosks, payment terminals) and emergency-notification technology.

I will have five minutes to speak. The following is a written copy of my proposed testimony. I welcome all constructive feedback.

Ontario Lawyers to Represent Injured Vets for Free

Published On Tue Dec 14 2010

Tracy and Bill Kerr watch as wreaths are laid on Remembrance Day. Ontario lawyers moved by the stories of Canada’s wounded soldiers like Bill Kerr, say they’ll represent injured veterans for free.

RENE JOHNSTON/TORONTO STAR
Tanya Talaga Queen’s Park Bureau
Allan Woods Ottawa Bureau

Moved by the stories of Canada’s wounded soldiers who’ve come home only to be forced to fight the federal government for benefits, Ontario’s trial lawyers say they’ll represent injured veterans for free.

And in Ottawa, sources tell the Star that the Liberals will present legislation Tuesday that, if passed, would elevate the Office of the Veterans’ Ombudsman so that it reports to Parliament, and not the minister of national defence, as is currently the case.

Phone for the Hard of Hearing

06 Dec 2010 by Editor

Vodacom has launched the Bellen A100 handset in South Africa, as an innovative solution for ‘hard of hearing’ mobile users. It is not only useful for people with hearing difficulties, but also makes clear communication possible for people who work in noisy environments.

Vodacom on Friday launched the Bellen A100 handset which is aimed at improving hearing ability for mobile users who cannot hear clearly.
 
This device is designed for people who are ‘hard of hearing,’ which means people who have hearing difficulties.  The A100 also makes clear communication possible for people who work in noisy environments.

DOJ Posts Online Editions of its 2010 ADA Standards

Posted to site December 10, 2010

The Department of Justice (DOJ) has posted official editions of its new 2010 ADA standards and companion guidance on its
ADA website.

Disabled Need Access, Not More Promises

By HARRY WOLBERT, For the Winnipeg Sun
Last Updated: December 8, 2010 10:59pm

The Manitoba Human Rights Commission’s 2009 report once again confirmed that discrimination based on disability is the foremost human rights issue facing this province.

Complaints based on disability accounted for 46.6% of all the human rights complaints filed with the MHRC in 2009.

A growing concern among disability advocates centres around having access to all of the supports and services they need.

I continue to hear from those who’ve had access to a service either denied or cut back. I’m of the opinion no person should be denied access to the supports and services they need.

Quebec Short On English Sign-Language Translators

CBC news, Wednesday, December 8, 2010

Advocates for Quebec’s deaf Anglophone community say there is a huge gap in visual interpreting services in the province — and more professionals need to be trained.

JoAnne Stump has been deaf all her life and relies on sign language to communicate. (CBC)
Thousands of deaf Anglophones in Quebec use American sign language to communicate in their day-to-day lives. But only a handful of qualified
interpreters are trained to translate the sign language into spoken English.

JoAnne Stump has been unable to hear her whole life, and has difficulty communicating through speech.

Meeting the Needs of Special Needs Students Virtually

Students who interact with their peers during lessons are more motivated, more engaged with material, and more capable at learning language, communications, and listening skills. How do you retain that interaction for special needs students who might not have regular access–or any access–to a traditional classroom?

By Denise Harrison
12/08/10

A student at A.J. West Elementary School in Aberdeen, WA did not speak. Ever. She was a selective mute, and no one in the area, located more than 100 miles from Seattle, knew how to treat a child who simply refused to talk. The school’s technology coordinator suggested a video conference with professionals who had experience with selective mutes in order to collaborate on an individualized education plan (IEP).

Disabled and Reduced Mobility Airport Guide

Traveling with a disability or even a mobility problem can be a daunting experience if the proper assistance and help is not available at the Airport. We
have created a small guide with information and tips to hopefully make your trip flow more smoothly and without problems.

Read more at
http://www.parkat.co.uk/disabled/

Dummies’ Guide to Web Accessibility for Disabled People

There isn’t a need for individual websites to install technologies to assist people with disability. What’s needed is to ensure the website is compatible
with tools that people with disabilities use.

For instance, if a blind person is visiting a website means he or she is switching on the browser, and typing the web address in the address bar. This means the person already has a tool that helps logging onto the website. Moreover, disabled persons use several websites like everybody, hence they don’t need any special software to access the website. In fact, by doing so, one would be making the process tedious for them.

Read more at
http://www.badeyes.com/?p=266#more-266